Editoriales

Buenos Aires 01 de Mayo del 2022

CAUSES OF HYPONATREMIA / CAUSAS DE HIPONATREMIA

 

 Causes of Hyponatremia

 

                                                                                    Richard H. Stems, Michael Emmett

                                                                                            Up Date to septiembre 2013

 

INTRODUCTION 

Hyponatremia is commonly defined as a serum sodium concentration below 135 meq/L, but can vary to a small degree in different clinical laboratories [1].
The dilutional fall in serum sodium is in most patients associated with a proportional reduction in the serum osmolality, but there are some exceptions.
Virtually all patients, hyponatremia  results from the intake (either oral or intravenous) and subsequent retention of water [2]. A water load will, in normal individuals, be rapidly excreted as the dilutional fall in serum osmolality suppresses the release of antidiuretic hormone (ADH, also called vasopressin), thereby allowing excretion of the excess water in a dilute urine. The maximum attainable urine volume in normal individuals on a regular diet is over 10 L/day. This provides an enormous range of protection against the development of hyponatremia since the daily fluid intake in most healthy individuals is less than 2 to 2.5 L/day.
In contrast to the response in normal individuals, patients who develop hyponatremia typically have an impairment in renal water excretion, most often due to an inability to suppress ADH secretion. An uncommon exception occurs in patients with primary polydipsia who can become hyponatremic because they drink such large quantities of fluid that they overwhelm the excretory capacity of the kidney even though ADH release is appropriately suppressed.

CLASSIFICATION 

At least two classification systems have been used for the etiology of hyponatremia with a low serum osmolality:
   * Stratifies patients according to whether circulating antidiuretic hormone (ADH) levels are inappropriately elevated or appropriately suppressed [2]
   * Stratifies patients according to volume status (hypovolemia, normovolemia, or hypervolemia) [4,5].
In either case, the development of hyponatremia requires the intake of water that cannot be excreted.
The individual causes of hyponatremia are described below in the appropriate sections.

According to serum ADH levels 

Urinary excretion of a water load requires the suppression of ADH release, which is mediated by the reduction in serum osmolality. An inability to suppress ADH release is the most common cause of hyponatremia and can be seen in the following settings:

  • True volume depletion, which can be due to gastrointestinal losses (eg, vomiting or diarrhea) or renal losses (most often thiazide rather than loop diuretics)
  • Decreased tissue perfusion (also called effective volume depletion) due to reduced cardiac output in heart failure or to systemic vasodilation in cirrhosis
  • A primary (ie, not hypovolemic) increase in ADH release in the syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion (SIADH), including an infrequent variant characterized by resetting of the osmostat.

There are also disorders in which hyponatremia occurs despite appropriate suppression of ADH secretion. These include primary polydipsia, a low dietary solute intake, and advanced renal failure

According to volume status 
The causes of hyponatremia can also be stratified by volume status [4,5]:

  • Hypovolemia due to gastrointestinal losses (eg, vomiting or diarrhea) or renal losses (most often thiazide rather than loop diuretics)
  • Normovolemia, which is most often associated with the SIADH but can also be seen with primary polydipsia and a low dietary solute intake
  • Hypervolemia due to heart failure or cirrhosis

Hyponatremia can also occur in patients with advanced renal failure. These patients may appear either euvolemic or, if they also retain salt and develop edema, hypervolemic

HYPONATREMIA WITH A LOW SERUM OSMOLALITY 

The serum osmolality (Sosm) is determined by the concentration in millimoles per liter of the major serum solutes according to the following equation:

                 Sosm = (2 x serum [Na]) + (serum [glucose]/18) + (blood urea nitrogen/2.8)

The serum sodium concentration is multiplied by two to account for the accompanying anions (mostly chloride and bicarbonate) that provide electroneutrality, and the corrections in the glucose concentration and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) are to convert mg/dL into mmol/L. These corrections in glucose and BUN do not need to be made when standard units are used.
The contributions of glucose and BUN to the serum osmolality are normally small, except in conditions such as diabetes mellitus and renal failure. Thus, the serum osmolality can be estimated in most patients by doubling the serum sodium concentration
The two most common causes of hyponatremia with a low serum osmolality are effective arterial blood volume depletion and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (ADH) secretion, both of which are associated with persistent ADH release [4-6].
Most patients with hyponatremia have a single cause but, in selected patients, multiple factors contribute to the fall in serum sodium. Symptomatic infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is an example of this phenomenon, as volume depletion, the syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion, and adrenal insufficiency all may be present

Effective arterial blood volume depletion 
The term effective arterial blood volume (also called effective circulating volume refers to the volume of arterial blood that is perfusing the tissues. Effective arterial blood volume depletion can occur by two mechanisms: true volume depletion; and edematous patients with heart failure or cirrhosis in whom tissue perfusion is reduced because of a low cardiac output or arterial vasodilation, respectively. The reduction in tissue perfusion is sensed by baroreceptors at three sites: in the carotid sinus and aortic arch that regulate sympathetic activity and, with significant volume depletion, the release of antidiuretic hormone; in the glomerular afferent arterioles that regulate the activity of the renin-angiotensin system; and in the atria and ventricles that regulate the release of natriuretic peptides.
Regardless of the mechanism, significantly decreased tissue perfusion is a potent stimulus to the secretion of ADH. This response is mediated by baroreceptors in the carotid sinus, which sense a reduction in pressure or stretch, and can overcome the inhibitory effect of hyponatremia on ADH secretion. Thus, water retention and hyponatremia can develop in patients with any disorder causing effective arterial blood volume depletion

True volume depletion 
True volume depletion can be caused by the loss of sodium and water from the gastrointestinal tract (eg, vomiting or diarrhea), in the urine (most often due to diuretic therapy), or bleeding. Such patients may also have hypokalemia and, if enough fluid is lost, azotemia due to decreased renal perfusion.
The replacement of severe diarrhea losses due to cholera (which is associated with a sodium concentration in stool of 120 to 140 meq/L) with an oral rehydration solution with reduced osmolality (ie, more free water) may result in an increased incidence of hyponatremia as compared to replacement with standard oral rehydration therapy, which has a higher sodium concentration [7].
Hyponatremia, which can be severe, is occasional potential complication of therapy with a thiazide diuretic that usually begins soon after the onset of thiazide therapy. Although hypovolemia can contribute, most patients appear clinically euvolemic and increased water intake and reduced diluting ability (a direct effect of reduced sodium chloride reabsorption without water in the distal tubule) are primarily responsible for the hyponatremia. Hyponatremia is only rarely seen with loop diuretics, since the inhibition of sodium chloride transport in the loop of Henle prevents the generation of the countercurrent gradient and therefore limits the ability of ADH to promote water retention.

Heart failure and cirrhosis 
Even though the plasma and extracellular volumes may be markedly increased in heart failure and cirrhosis, the pressure sensed at the carotid sinus baroreceptors is reduced due to the fall in cardiac output in heart failure and to arterial vasodilatation in cirrhosis [2,8]. Thus, serum ADH levels tend to vary with the severity of the underlying disease, making the development of hyponatremia an important prognostic sign. A stable serum sodium below 130 meq/L is a marker of near end-stage disease.
In comparison, hyponatremia is an uncommon finding in patients with the nephrotic syndrome in the absence of concurrent renal failure. Most such patients have relatively normal tissue perfusion and do not have a clinically important stimulus to ADH secretion.

Syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion 
Persistent ADH release and water retention can be seen in a variety of disorders that are not associated with hypovolemia, a condition called syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion (SIADH). Major causes include central nervous system disease, malignancy, certain drugs, and post-surgery.

Hormonal changes 
Hyponatremia due primarily to inappropriate ADH secretion can also occur in patients with adrenal insufficiency (in which it is lack of cortisol that is responsible for the hyponatremia) and with hypothyroidism
On the other hand, the release of human chorionic gonadotropin during pregnancy may be responsible for the mild resetting of the osmostat downward that is responsible for a fall in the serum sodium concentration of about 5 meq/L [9].
Although SIADH is more common, ectopic atrial natriuretic peptide production may be rarely associated with hyponatremia in some patients with small cell lung cancer [10-12].

Exercise-associated hyponatremia
Marathon and ultramarathon runners can develop potentially severe hyponatremia that is primarily due to excessive water intake combined, in many cases, with impaired water excretion due to persistent ADH secretion. A similar sequence can occur during military operations and desert hikes.

Hyponatremia despite appropriate suppression of ADH 
There are several conditions in which hyponatremia can occur despite suppression of ADH release: advanced renal failure, primary polydipsia, and low dietary solute intake.

Advanced renal failure 
The relative ability to excrete free water (free water excretion divided by the glomerular filtration rate) is not significantly impaired in patients with mild to moderate renal failure [13]. Thus, normonatremia is usually maintained.
In contrast, in advanced renal failure, the minimum urine osmolality rises to as high as 200 to 250 mosmol/kg despite the appropriate suppression of ADH [14]. The osmotic diuresis induced by increased solute excretion per functioning nephron is thought to be responsible for the inability to dilute the urine.
The impairment in free water excretion in advanced renal failure can lead to the retention of ingested water and the development of hyponatremia. Although the water retention will also lower the serum osmolality, this will be offset at least in part by the elevation in blood urea nitrogen (BUN). As a result, the measured serum osmolality may be normal or even increased, a finding that can also be seen in some other disorders.  , ,
However, there is a difference between the measured serum osmolality and the effective serum osmolality. Urea is an ineffective osmole, since it can freely cross cell membranes and therefore does not obligate water movement out of the cells. Thus, patients with hyponatremia and renal failure have a low effective serum osmolality (Sosm) that becomes apparent if the measured Sosm is corrected for the effect of urea:

                    Corrected Sosm = Measured Sosm - (BUN ÷ 2.8)

Dividing the BUN by 2.8 converts mg/dL into mmol/L, which is required when measuring osmolality. In countries in which blood urea is measured in units of mmol/L, the formula is:

                    Corrected Sosm  =  Measured Sosm  -  blood urea concentration

Primary polydipsia 
Primary polydipsia is a disorder in which there is a primary increase in thirst. It is most often seen in patients with psychiatric illnesses, particularly those taking antipsychotic drugs in whom the common side effect of a dry mouth leads to increased water intake [15-17]. Low dietary solute intake may contribute to the development of hyponatremia by limiting water excretion. Primary polydipsia can also occur with hypothalamic lesions that affect the thirst center, as can be seen with infiltrative diseases such as sarcoidosis [18].
The serum sodium concentration is usually normal or only slightly reduced in primary polydipsia, since the excess water is readily excreted [16]. These patients may be asymptomatic or present with complaints of polydipsia and polyuria.
In rare cases, water intake exceeds 10 to 15 L/day and potentially fatal hyponatremia may ensue even though the urine is maximally dilute with an osmolality below 100 mosmol/kg [19,20]. Symptomatic hyponatremia can also be induced with an acute 3 to 4 liter water load (as may rarely be seen in anxious patients preparing for a radiologic examination or for urinary drug testing) [21]. The tendency to hyponatremia in these settings will be increased if there is also an impairment in water excretion, as with nausea- or stress-induced ADH release or concurrent diuretic therapy [21,22].
Symptomatic and potentially fatal hyponatremia has also been described after ingestion of the designer amphetamine ecstasy (methylenedioxymethamphetamine or MDMA) [23-27]. A marked increase in water intake, inappropriate secretion of ADH, and ready availability of fluids all contribute [23,25,27-29]. Women appear to be more likely to develop coma following hyponatremia with ecstasy use [30].

Low dietary solute intake 
Beer drinkers or other malnourished patients (including those with low-protein, high water intake diets) may have a marked reduction in water excretory capacity that is directly mediated by poor dietary intake [31-33]. Ingestion of a normal diet results in the excretion of 600 to 900 mosmol of solute per day (primarily sodium and potassium salts and urea).
Thus, if the minimum urine osmolality is 60 mosmol/kg, the maximum urine output will be 10 to 15 L/day (eg, 900 mosmol/day ÷ 60 mosmol/kg = 15 L).
In contrast, beer contains little or no sodium, potassium, or protein, and the carbohydrate load will suppress endogenous protein breakdown and therefore urea excretion. As a result, daily solute excretion may fall below 250 mosmol, leading to a reduction in the maximum urine output to below 4 L/day even though the urine is maximally dilute. Hyponatremia will ensue if more than this amount of fluid is taken in.

HYPONATREMIA WITH A HIGH OR NORMAL SERUM OSMOLALITY 

Although hyponatremia is typically associated with a proportional reduction in serum osmolality, some patients have a high or normal serum osmolality. One example, advanced renal failure, was described above. In that disorder, the associated elevation in blood urea nitrogen can counteract the fall in serum osmolality induced by hyponatremia. However, the effective serum osmolality is appropriately reduced in this setting since urea is an ineffective osmole.
In the following sections on high and normal serum osmolality, the development of hyponatremia is linked to the factor that affects the serum osmolality. It is also possible that the factor that raises the serum osmolality is independent of the development of hyponatremia. One example of such an effect is alcohol ingestion [34]. This will not cause hyponatremia but, in patients who are hyponatremic, significant alcohol ingestion can raise the serum osmolality to normal or high values.

High serum osmolality 
Hyponatremia with a high serum osmolality is most often due to marked hyperglycemia in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis or hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (also known as nonketotic hyperglycemia). Less common causes include the administration and subsequent retention of hypertonic mannitol  or of maltose or sucrose when intravenous inmune globulin is given in a maltose or sucrose solution to patients with renal failure.
The rise in serum osmolality induced by hyperglycemia, mannitol, maltose, or sucrose pulls water out of the cells, thereby lowering the serum sodium concentration by dilution.

Marked hyperglycemia 
The changes that can occur in patients with marked hyperglycemia are discussed in detail elsewhere but will be briefly reviewed here
Physiologic calculations suggest that the serum sodium concentration should fall by 1 meq/L for every 62 mg/dL (3.5 mmol/L) rise in the serum glucose concentration [35]. However, this standard correction factor was not verified experimentally.
In an attempt to address this issue, hyperglycemia was induced in six healthy subjects by the administration of both somatostatin (to block endogenous insulin secretion) and a hypertonic dextrose solution [36]. A nonlinear relationship was observed between the changes in the glucose and sodium concentrations:

  • The 1:62 ratio applied when the serum glucose concentration was less than 400 mg/dL (22.2 mmol/L).
  • At higher glucose concentrations, there was a greater reduction in the serum sodium concentration (1:25 ratio, ie, a 4 meq/L reduction in serum sodium per 100 mg/dL further increase in serum glucose).

These calculations are idealized since they do not account for the osmotic diuresis typically induced by glucose excretion in the urine. The loss of water in excess of sodium and potassium will raise the serum sodium concentration. Some patients with uncontrolled diabetes have such a marked osmotic diuresis that, at presentation, the serum sodium concentration is increased and the serum osmolality is markedly elevated.
The calculations are best used to estimate how much the serum sodium concentration will rise as the hyperglycemia is corrected. The administration of insulin drives glucose and water into the cells, reversing the initial direction of water movement and raising the serum sodium concentration

Normal serum osmolality

Nonconductive irrigation solutions 
Isosmotic hyponatremia can be produced by the addition of an isosmotic (or near isosmotic) but non-sodium-containing fluid to the extracellular space. This problem primarily results from the absorption of variable quantities of nonconductive glycine or sorbitol irrigation solutions during transurethral resection of the prostate or bladder (called the transurethral resection syndrome) or during hysteroscopy or laparoscopic surgery.
These patients may develop marked hyponatremia (below 110 meq/L) and neurologic symptoms. Multiple factors can contribute to the neurologic symptoms, including the very low serum sodium concentration itself, glycine toxicity, and the accumulation of ammonia, serine, or glyoxalate from the metabolism of glycine.

Pseudohyponatremia 
Pseudohyponatremia, which is associated with a normal serum osmolality, refers to those disorders in which marked elevations in serum lipids or proteins result in a reduction in the fraction of serum that is water and an artificially low serum sodium concentration [2,37,38]. In normal subjects, the plasma water is approximately 93 percent of the plasma volume, with fats and proteins accounting for the remaining 7 percent. Thus, a normal plasma sodium concentration of 142 meq/L (measured per liter of plasma) actually represents a concentration in the physiologically important plasma water of 154 meq/L (142 ÷ 0.93 = 154).
The plasma water fraction may fall below 80 percent in patients with marked hyperlipidemia (as with lactescent serum in uncontrolled diabetes mellitus) or hyperproteinemia (as in multiple myeloma). In these settings, the plasma water sodium concentration and plasma osmolality are unchanged, but the measured sodium concentration in the total plasma volume will be reduced since the specimen contains less plasma water. How pseudohyponatremia can be diagnosed is discussed separately.

SUMMARY

  • Although the definition may vary slightly among clinical laboratories, hyponatremia is commonly defined as a serum sodium concentration below 135 meq/L. In virtually all patients, hyponatremia is due to the intake (either oral or intravenous) of water that cannot be excreted. This is usually accompanied by a proportional fall in serum osmolality but there are settings in the which the serum osmolality is high or normal.
  • At least two classification systems have been used for the etiology of hyponatremia with a low serum osmolality: one stratifies patients according to whether circulating antidiuretic hormone (ADH) levels are inappropriately elevated or appropriately suppressed, and the other stratifies patients according to volume status (hypovolemia, normovolemia, or hypervolemia).
  • There are two major causes of hyponatremia with a low serum osmolality, both of which are associated with elevated serum ADH levels
  • Effective arterial blood volume depletion, which may be associated with true volume depletion (due, for example, to gastrointestinal or renal losses, as with thiazide diuretics) or with hypervolemia in patients with heart failure or cirrhosis.
  • Heart failure and cirrhosis cause hyponatremia despite increased plasma volume because the pressure sensed at the carotid sinus baroreceptors is reduced due to the fall in cardiac output in heart failure and to peripheral vasodilatation in cirrhosis. The rise in serum ADH levels varies with the severity of the disease, making the development of hyponatremia an important adverse prognostic sign.
  • Normovolemia in the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH).
  • Hyponatremia with a low serum osmolality can also occur in a number of other settings:
  • In association with hormonal changes, such adrenal insufficiency, hypothyroidism, the release of human chorionic gonadotropin during pregnancy, and ectopic production of atrial natriuretic peptide.
  • In marathon and ultramarathon runners due to excessive water intake combined with impaired water excretion due to persistent ADH secretion. A similar sequence can occur during military operations and desert hikes
  • Despite appropriate suppression of ADH release in patients with advanced renal failure, primary polydipsia, and low dietary solute intake.
  • Hyponatremia can also occur in patients with a high or normal serum osmolality; in addition to the following disorders which cause both hyponatremia and a high or normal serum osmolality, ethanol ingestion can raise the serum osmolality in patients who are hyponatremic for some other reason
  • Hyponatremia with a high serum osmolality can be seen with hyperglycemia, advanced renal failure, or, less often, in association with the administration of hypertonic mannitol or maltose. In advanced renal failure, the associated elevation in blood urea nitrogen can counteract the fall in serum osmolality induced by hyponatremia. However, the effective serum osmolality is appropriately reduced in this setting since urea is an ineffective osmole.
  • Hyponatremia with a normal (or near-normal) serum osmolality can result from the addition of an isosmotic but non-sodium-containing fluid to the extracellular space, as occurs with the use of nonconductive glycine or sorbitol flushing solutions during transurethral resection of the prostate or bladder
  • Pseudohyponatremia is defined as an artificially low serum sodium concentration associated with a normal serum osmolality due to marked elevations in lipids or proteins, resulting in a reduction in the water-containing fraction of serum.

   ________________________________________________________________________________


INTRODUCCIÓN


La hiponatremia se define comúnmente como una concentración sérica de sodio por debajo de 135 meq/L, pero puede variar un poco en diferentes laboratorios clínicos [1].
La caída dilucional del sodio sérico se asocia en la mayoría de los pacientes con una reducción proporcional de la osmolaridad sérica, pero hay algunas excepciones.
Prácticamente en todos los pacientes, la hiponatremia se debe a la ingesta (ya sea oral o intravenosa) y la posterior retención de agua [2]. Una carga de agua, en individuos normales, se excretará rápidamente ya que la caída dilucional de la osmolalidad sérica suprime la liberación de hormona antidiurética (ADH, también llamada vasopresina), lo que permite la excreción del exceso de agua en una orina diluida. El volumen de orina máximo alcanzable en individuos normales con una dieta regular es de más de 10 L/día. Esto proporciona una enorme gama de protección contra el desarrollo de hiponatremia ya que la ingesta diaria de líquidos en la mayoría de los individuos sanos es de menos de 2 a 2,5 L/día.
En contraste con la respuesta en individuos normales, los pacientes que desarrollan hiponatremia típicamente tienen un deterioro en la excreción renal de agua, más a menudo debido a la incapacidad para suprimir la secreción de ADH. Una excepción poco común ocurre en pacientes con polidipsia primaria que pueden volverse hiponatrémicos porque beben cantidades tan grandes de líquido que abruman la capacidad excretora del riñón, incluso aunque la liberación de ADH esté adecuadamente suprimida.

CLASIFICACIÓN


Se han utilizado al menos dos sistemas de clasificación para la etiología de la hiponatremia con baja osmolalidad sérica:
* Estratifica a los pacientes según si los niveles circulantes de hormona antidiurética (ADH) están inapropiadamente elevados o adecuadamente suprimidos [2]
* Estratifica a los pacientes según el estado del volumen (hipovolemia, normovolemia o hipervolemia) [4,5].
En cualquier caso, el desarrollo de hiponatremia requiere la ingesta de agua que no se puede excretar.
Las causas individuales de hiponatremia se describen a continuación en las secciones correspondientes.

Según los niveles séricos de ADH

La excreción urinaria de una carga de agua requiere la supresión de la liberación de ADH, que está mediada por la reducción de la osmolalidad sérica. La incapacidad para suprimir la liberación de ADH es la causa más común de hiponatremia y se puede observar en los siguientes entornos:
Depleción de volumen real, que puede deberse a pérdidas gastrointestinales (p. ej., vómitos o diarrea) o pérdidas renales (más a menudo tiazida en lugar de diuréticos de asa)
Disminución de la perfusión tisular (también denominada depleción de volumen efectivo) debido a la reducción del gasto cardíaco en la insuficiencia cardíaca o a la vasodilatación sistémica en la cirrosis
Un aumento primario (es decir, no hipovolémico) en la liberación de ADH en el síndrome de secreción inadecuada de ADH (SIADH), incluida una variante infrecuente caracterizada por el restablecimiento del osmostato.
También hay trastornos en los que se produce hiponatremia a pesar de la supresión adecuada de la secreción de ADH.Estos incluyen polidipsia primaria, baja ingesta de solutos en la dieta e insuficiencia renal avanzada.

Según el estado del volumen
Las causas de la hiponatremia también se pueden estratificar según el estado del volumen [4,5]:
Hipovolemia debida a pérdidas gastrointestinales (p. ej., vómitos o diarrea) o pérdidas renales (la mayoría de las veces tiazida en lugar de diuréticos de asa)
Normovolemia, que se asocia con mayor frecuencia con el SIADH, pero también se puede observar con polidipsia primaria y una baja ingesta de solutos en la dieta.
Hipervolemia por insuficiencia cardiaca o cirrosis
La hiponatremia también puede ocurrir en pacientes con insuficiencia renal avanzada. Estos pacientes pueden parecer euvolémicos o, si además retienen sal y desarrollan edema, hipervolémicos.

HIPONATREMIA CON BAJA OSMOLALIDAD SÉRICA

La osmolalidad sérica (Sosm) está determinada por la concentración en milimoles por litro de los principales solutos séricos de acuerdo con la siguiente ecuación:
            Sosm = (2 x suero[Na]) + (suero[glucosa]/18) + (nitrógeno ureico en sangre/2,8)
La concentración sérica de sodio se multiplica por dos para tener en cuenta los aniones acompañantes (principalmente cloruro y bicarbonato) que proporcionan electroneutralidad, y las correcciones en la concentración de glucosa y el nitrógeno ureico en sangre (BUN) son para convertir mg/dL en mmol/L. No es necesario realizar estas correcciones en glucosa y BUN cuando se utilizan unidades estándar.
Las contribuciones de glucosa y BUN a la osmolalidad sérica normalmente son pequeñas, excepto en condiciones como la diabetes mellitus y la insuficiencia renal. Por lo tanto, la osmolalidad sérica se puede estimar en la mayoría de los pacientes duplicando la concentración sérica de sodio.
Las dos causas más comunes de hiponatremia con una osmolalidad sérica baja son la depleción efectiva del volumen sanguíneo arterial y el síndrome de secreción inadecuada de hormona antidiurética (ADH), los cuales están asociados con la liberación persistente de ADH [4-6].
La mayoría de los pacientes con hiponatremia tienen una sola causa pero, en pacientes seleccionados, múltiples factores contribuyen a la caída del sodio sérico.La infección sintomática por el virus de la inmunodeficiencia humana (VIH) es un ejemplo de este fenómeno, ya que pueden estar presentes la depleción de volumen, el síndrome de secreción inadecuada de ADH y la insuficiencia suprarrenal.

Depleción efectiva del volumen de sangre arterial
El término volumen de sangre arterial efectivo (también llamado volumen circulante efectivo) se refiere al volumen de sangre arterial que perfunde los tejidos. La depleción del volumen de sangre arterial efectivo puede ocurrir por dos mecanismos: depleción de volumen real y pacientes edematosos con insuficiencia cardíaca o cirrosis en quienes la perfusión tisular se reduce debido a un gasto cardíaco bajo o vasodilatación arterial, respectivamente.La reducción en la perfusión tisular es detectada por barorreceptores en tres sitios: en el seno carotídeo y el arco aórtico que regulan la actividad simpática y, con una depleción de volumen significativa, la liberación de hormona antidiurética, en las arteriolas aferentes glomerulares que regulan la actividad del sistema renina-angiotensina, y en las aurículas y ventrículos que regulan la liberación de péptidos natriuréticos.
Independientemente del mecanismo, la perfusión tisular significativamente disminuida es un estímulo potente para la secreción de ADH. Esta respuesta está mediada por barorreceptores en el seno carotídeo, que detectan una reducción de la presión o el estiramiento y pueden superar el efecto inhibidor de la hiponatremia sobre la secreción de ADH. Por lo tanto, la retención de agua y la hiponatremia pueden desarrollarse en pacientes con cualquier trastorno que provoque una depleción efectiva del volumen sanguíneo arterial.

Depleción de volumen real
La depleción de volumen real puede ser causada por la pérdida de sodio y agua del tracto gastrointestinal (p. ej., vómitos o diarrea), en la orina (más a menudo debido a la terapia con diuréticos) o sangrado. Dichos pacientes también pueden tener hipopotasemia y, si se pierde suficiente líquido, hiperazoemia debido a la disminución de la perfusión renal.
El reemplazo de las pérdidas por diarrea severa debida al cólera (que se asocia con una concentración de sodio en las heces de 120 a 140 meq/L) con una solución de rehidratación oral con osmolalidad reducida (es decir, más agua libre) puede resultar en una mayor incidencia de hiponatremia. en comparación con el reemplazo con la terapia de rehidratación oral estándar, que tiene una mayor concentración de sodio [7].
La hiponatremia, que puede ser grave, es una complicación potencial ocasional del tratamiento con un diurético tiazídico que suele comenzar poco después del inicio del tratamiento tiazídico. Aunque la hipovolemia puede contribuir, la mayoría de los pacientes parecen clínicamente euvolémicos y el aumento de la ingesta de agua y la reducción de la capacidad de dilución (un efecto directo de la reducción de la reabsorción de cloruro de sodio sin agua en el túbulo distal) son los principales responsables de la hiponatremia. Rara vez se observa hiponatremia con los diuréticos del asa, ya que la inhibición del transporte de cloruro de sodio en el asa de Henle impide la generación del gradiente de contracorriente y, por lo tanto, limita la capacidad de la ADH para promover la retención de agua.

Insuficiencia cardiaca y cirrosis
Aunque los volúmenes plasmático y extracelular pueden aumentar notablemente en la insuficiencia cardíaca y la cirrosis, la presión detectada en los barorreceptores del seno carotídeo se reduce debido a la caída del gasto cardíaco en la insuficiencia cardíaca y a la vasodilatación arterial en la cirrosis [2,8]. Por lo tanto, los niveles séricos de ADH tienden a variar con la gravedad de la enfermedad subyacente, lo que hace que el desarrollo de hiponatremia sea un signo pronóstico importante. Un sodio sérico estable por debajo de 130 meq/L es un marcador de enfermedad en etapa terminal cercana.
En comparación, la hiponatremia es un hallazgo poco común en pacientes con síndrome nefrótico en ausencia de insuficiencia renal concurrente. La mayoría de estos pacientes tienen una perfusión tisular relativamente normal y no tienen un estímulo clínicamente importante para la secreción de ADH.

Síndrome de secreción inadecuada de ADH
La liberación persistente de ADH y la retención de agua se pueden observar en una variedad de trastornos que no están asociados con hipovolemia, una condición llamada síndrome de secreción inadecuada de ADH (SIADH). Las principales causas incluyen enfermedad del sistema nervioso central, malignidad, ciertos medicamentos y poscirugía.

Cambios hormonales
La hiponatremia debida principalmente a la secreción inadecuada de ADH también puede ocurrir en pacientes con insuficiencia suprarrenal (en los que la falta de cortisol es responsable de la hiponatremia) y con hipotiroidismo.
Por otro lado, la liberación de gonadotropina coriónica humana durante el embarazo puede ser responsable del leve reajuste hacia abajo del osmostato que es responsable de una caída en la concentración sérica de sodio de alrededor de 5 meq/L [9].
Aunque el SIADH es más común, la producción ectópica de péptido natriurético auricular rara vez se asocia con hiponatremia en algunos pacientes con cáncer de pulmón de células pequeñas [10-12].

Hiponatremia asociada al ejercicio
Los corredores de maratón y ultramaratón pueden desarrollar hiponatremia potencialmente grave que se debe principalmente a la ingesta excesiva de agua combinada, en muchos casos, con una excreción deficiente de agua debido a la secreción persistente de ADH. Una secuencia similar puede ocurrir durante las operaciones militares y las caminatas por el desierto.
Hiponatremia a pesar de la supresión apropiada de ADH
Hay varias condiciones en las que puede ocurrir hiponatremia a pesar de la supresión de la liberación de ADH: insuficiencia renal avanzada, polidipsia primaria y bajo consumo de solutos en la dieta.

Insuficiencia renal avanzada
La capacidad relativa para excretar agua libre (excreción de agua libre dividida por la tasa de filtración glomerular) no se altera significativamente en pacientes con insuficiencia renal de leve a moderada [13]. Por lo tanto, la normonatremia generalmente se mantiene.
Por el contrario, en la insuficiencia renal avanzada, la osmolalidad urinaria mínima se eleva hasta 200 a 250 mosmol/kg a pesar de la supresión adecuada de la ADH [14]. Se cree que la diuresis osmótica inducida por el aumento de la excreción de solutos por nefrona funcional es responsable de la incapacidad para diluir la orina.
La alteración de la excreción de agua libre en la insuficiencia renal avanzada puede conducir a la retención del agua ingerida y al desarrollo de hiponatremia. Aunque la retención de agua también reducirá la osmolalidad sérica, esto se verá compensado, al menos en parte, por la elevación del nitrógeno ureico en sangre (BUN). Como resultado, la osmolalidad sérica medida puede ser normal o incluso aumentada, un hallazgo que también se puede observar en algunos otros trastornos. , ,
Sin embargo, existe una diferencia entre la osmolalidad sérica medida y la osmolalidad sérica efectiva. La urea es un osmol ineficaz, ya que puede atravesar libremente las membranas celulares y, por lo tanto, no obliga a que el agua salga de las células. Por lo tanto, los pacientes con hiponatremia e insuficiencia renal tienen una osmolaridad sérica efectiva baja (Sosm) que se hace evidente si la Sosm medida se corrige por el efecto de la urea:
                       Sosm Corregido = Sosm Medido - (BUN ÷ 2.8)
Dividir el BUN por 2,8 convierte mg/dL en mmol/L, lo que se requiere al medir la osmolalidad.En los países en los que la urea en sangre se mide en unidades de mmol/L, la fórmula es:
                      Sosm corregido  =  Sosm medido  - concentración de urea en sangre

Polidipsia primaria
La polidipsia primaria es un trastorno en el que hay un aumento primario de la sed. Se observa con mayor frecuencia en pacientes con enfermedades psiquiátricas, particularmente en aquellos que toman medicamentos antipsicóticos en quienes el efecto secundario común de sequedad de boca conduce a una mayor ingesta de agua [15-17]. La baja ingesta de solutos en la dieta puede contribuir al desarrollo de hiponatremia al limitar la excreción de agua. La polidipsia primaria también puede ocurrir con lesiones hipotalámicas que afectan el centro de la sed, como puede verse en enfermedades infiltrativas como la sarcoidosis [18].
La concentración sérica de sodio suele ser normal o solo ligeramente reducida en la polidipsia primaria, ya que el exceso de agua se excreta fácilmente [16]. Estos pacientes pueden estar asintomáticos o presentar quejas de polidipsia y poliuria.
En casos raros, la ingesta de agua supera los 10 a 15 l/día y puede producirse una hiponatremia potencialmente mortal aunque la orina se diluya al máximo con una osmolalidad inferior a 100 mosmol/kg [19,20]. La hiponatremia sintomática también se puede inducir con una carga de agua aguda de 3 a 4 litros (como rara vez se observa en pacientes ansiosos que se preparan para un examen radiológico o para una prueba de drogas en orina) [21]. La tendencia a la hiponatremia en estos contextos aumentará si también hay un deterioro en la excreción de agua, como con la liberación de ADH inducida por náuseas o estrés o la terapia diurética concurrente [21,22].También se ha descrito hiponatremia sintomática y potencialmente mortal después de la ingestión del éxtasis de anfetamina de diseño (metilendioximetanfetamina o MDMA) [23-27]. Un marcado aumento en la ingesta de agua, la secreción inadecuada de ADH y la fácil disponibilidad de líquidos contribuyen [23,25,27-29]. Las mujeres parecen ser más propensas a desarrollar coma después de hiponatremia con el consumo de éxtasis[30].

Baja ingesta de solutos en la dieta
Los bebedores de cerveza u otros pacientes desnutridos (incluidos aquellos con dietas bajas en proteínas y altas en agua) pueden tener una marcada reducción en la capacidad excretora de agua que está directamente mediada por una ingesta dietética deficiente [31-33]. La ingestión de una dieta normal da como resultado la excreción de 600 a 900 mosmol de soluto por día (principalmente sales de sodio y potasio y urea).
Por lo tanto, si la osmolaridad mínima de la orina es de 60 mosmol/kg, la diuresis máxima será de 10 a 15 L/día (p. ej., 900 mosmol/día ÷ 60 mosmol/kg = 15 L).
Por el contrario, la cerveza contiene poco o nada de sodio, potasio o proteína, y la carga de carbohidratos suprimirá la descomposición endógena de proteínas y, por lo tanto, la excreción de urea. Como resultado, la excreción diaria de solutos puede caer por debajo de 250 mosmol, lo que lleva a una reducción en la diuresis máxima por debajo de 4 L/día, incluso aunque la orina esté diluida al máximo. Se producirá hiponatremia si se ingiere más de esta cantidad de líquido.

HIPONATREMIA CON OSMOLALIDAD SÉRICA ALTA O NORMAL

Aunque la hiponatremia se asocia típicamente con una reducción proporcional de la osmolalidad sérica, algunos pacientes tienen una osmolalidad sérica alta o normal. Un ejemplo, insuficiencia renal avanzada, se describió anteriormente. En ese trastorno, la elevación asociada del nitrógeno ureico en sangre puede contrarrestar la caída de la osmolaridad sérica inducida por la hiponatremia. Sin embargo, la osmolaridad sérica efectiva se reduce apropiadamente en este contexto ya que la urea es un osmol ineficaz.
En las siguientes secciones sobre osmolalidad sérica alta y normal, el desarrollo de hiponatremia está relacionado con el factor que afecta la osmolalidad sérica. También es posible que el factor que eleva la osmolalidad sérica sea independiente del desarrollo de hiponatremia. Un ejemplo de tal efecto es la ingestión de alcohol [34]. Esto no causará hiponatremia pero, en pacientes hiponatrémicos, la ingestión significativa de alcohol puede elevar la osmolalidad sérica a valores normales o altos.

Osmolalidad sérica alta
La hiponatremia con una osmolalidad sérica alta se debe más a menudo a hiperglucemia marcada en pacientes con cetoacidosis diabética o estado hiperglucémico hiperosmolar (también conocido como hiperglucemia no cetósica). Causas menos comunes incluyen la administración y posterior retención de manitol hipertónico o de maltosa o sacarosa cuando se administra inmunoglobulina intravenosa en una solución de maltosa o sacarosa a pacientes con insuficiencia renal.
El aumento de la osmolaridad sérica inducido por la hiperglucemia, el manitol, la maltosa o la sacarosa extrae agua de las células, lo que reduce la concentración sérica de sodio por dilución.

Hiperglucemia marcada
Los cambios que pueden ocurrir en pacientes con hiperglucemia marcada se analizan en detalle en otra parte, pero se revisarán brevemente aquí.
Los cálculos fisiológicos sugieren que la concentración sérica de sodio debería disminuir en 1 meq/l por cada aumento de 62 mg/dl (3,5 mmol/l) en la concentración sérica de glucosa [35]. Sin embargo, este factor de corrección estándar no se verificó experimentalmente.
En un intento de abordar este problema, se indujo hiperglucemia en seis sujetos sanos mediante la administración de somatostatina (para bloquear la secreción de insulina endógena) y una solución de dextrosa hipertónica [36]. Se observó una relación no lineal entre los cambios en las concentraciones de glucosa y sodio:
La relación 1:62 se aplicó cuando la concentración de glucosa en suero fue inferior a 400 mg/dL (22,2 mmol/L).A concentraciones de glucosa más altas, hubo una mayor reducción en la concentración de sodio sérico (proporción 1:25, es decir, una reducción de 4 meq/L en sodio sérico por cada 100 mg/dL de aumento adicional en glucosa sérica).
Estos cálculos están idealizados ya que no tienen en cuenta la diuresis osmótica típicamente inducida por la excreción de glucosa en la orina. La pérdida de agua en exceso de sodio y potasio elevará la concentración sérica de sodio.
Algunos pacientes con diabetes no controlada tienen una diuresis osmótica tan marcada que, en el momento de la presentación, la concentración sérica de sodio está aumentada y la osmolalidad sérica está notablemente elevada.
Los cálculos se utilizan mejor para estimar cuánto aumentará la concentración sérica de sodio a medida que se corrija la hiperglucemia. La administración de insulina impulsa la glucosa y el agua hacia el interior de las células, invirtiendo la dirección inicial del movimiento del agua y elevando la concentración sérica de sodio.

Osmolalidad sérica normal
Soluciones de riego no conductoras
La hiponatremia isosmótica puede producirse por la adición de un líquido isosmótico (o casi isosmótico) pero que no contiene sodio al espacio extracelular. Este problema se debe principalmente a la absorción de cantidades variables de soluciones de irrigación de glicina o sorbitol no conductoras durante la resección transuretral de la próstata o la vejiga (llamado síndrome de resección transuretral) o durante la histeroscopia o la cirugía laparoscópica.
Estos pacientes pueden desarrollar hiponatremia marcada (por debajo de 110 meq/L) y síntomas neurológicos. Múltiples factores pueden contribuir a los síntomas neurológicos, incluida la concentración sérica muy baja de sodio, la toxicidad de la glicina y la acumulación de amoníaco, serina o glioxalato del metabolismo de la glicina.

Pseudohiponatremia
La pseudohiponatremia, que se asocia con una osmolalidad sérica normal, se refiere a aquellos trastornos en los que las elevaciones marcadas de los lípidos o las proteínas séricas dan como resultado una reducción de la fracción sérica que es agua y una concentración sérica de sodio artificialmente baja [2,37,38] . En sujetos normales, el agua del plasma es aproximadamente el 93 por ciento del volumen de plasma, y ​​las grasas y proteínas representan el 7 por ciento restante. Por lo tanto, una concentración normal de sodio en plasma de 142 meq/L (medida por litro de plasma) en realidad representa una concentración en el agua plasmática fisiológicamente importante de 154 meq/L (142 ÷ 0,93 = 154).
La fracción de agua del plasma puede caer por debajo del 80 por ciento en pacientes con hiperlipidemia marcada (como con el suero lactescente en la diabetes mellitus no controlada) o hiperproteinemia (como en el mieloma múltiple). En estos entornos, la concentración de sodio en el agua del plasma y la osmolalidad del plasma no cambian, pero la concentración de sodio medida en el volumen total del plasma se reducirá ya que la muestra contiene menos agua en el plasma. La forma en que se puede diagnosticar la pseudohiponatremia se analiza por separado.

RESUMEN

   * Aunque la definición puede variar ligeramente entre los laboratorios clínicos, la hiponatremia se define comúnmente como una concentración sérica de sodio por debajo de 135 meq/L. En prácticamente todos los pacientes, la hiponatremia se debe a la ingesta (ya sea oral o intravenosa) de agua que no se puede excretar. Esto suele ir acompañado de una caída proporcional de la osmolalidad sérica, pero hay situaciones en las que la osmolalidad sérica es alta o normal.
   * Se han utilizado al menos dos sistemas de clasificación para la etiología de la hiponatremia con una osmolalidad sérica baja: uno estratifica a los pacientes según si los niveles circulantes de hormona antidiurética (ADH) están elevados o suprimidos de manera inapropiada, y el otro estratifica a los pacientes según el estado del volumen (hipovolemia , normovolemia o hipervolemia).
   * Hay dos causas principales de hiponatremia con una osmolalidad sérica baja, las cuales están asociadas con niveles séricos elevados de ADH.
   * Depleción efectiva del volumen sanguíneo arterial, que puede estar asociada con una verdadera depleción del volumen (debido, por ejemplo, a pérdidas gastrointestinales o renales, como con los diuréticos tiazídicos) o con hipervolemia en pacientes con insuficiencia cardíaca o cirrosis.
   * La insuficiencia cardíaca y la cirrosis causan hiponatremia a pesar del aumento del volumen plasmático porque la presión detectada en los barorreceptores del seno carotídeo se reduce debido a la caída del gasto cardíaco en la insuficiencia cardíaca y a la vasodilatación periférica en la cirrosis. El aumento de los niveles séricos de ADH varía con la gravedad de la enfermedad, lo que hace que el desarrollo de hiponatremia sea un importante signo de pronóstico adverso.Normovolemia en el síndrome de secreción inadecuada de hormona antidiurética (SIADH).
   * La hiponatremia con una osmolalidad sérica baja también puede ocurrir en varios otros entornos:
En asociación con cambios hormonales, como insuficiencia suprarrenal, hipotiroidismo, liberación de gonadotropina coriónica humana durante el embarazo y producción ectópica de péptido natriurético auricular.
   * En corredores de maratón y ultramaratón debido a la ingesta excesiva de agua combinada con una excreción deficiente de agua debido a la secreción persistente de ADH. Una secuencia similar puede ocurrir durante las operaciones militares y las caminatas por el desierto.
   * A pesar de la supresión adecuada de la liberación de ADH en pacientes con insuficiencia renal avanzada, polidipsia primaria y bajo consumo de solutos en la dieta.
   * La hiponatremia también puede ocurrir en pacientes con osmolalidad sérica alta o normal; Además de los siguientes trastornos que causan tanto hiponatremia como una osmolalidad sérica alta o normal, la ingestión de etanol puede elevar la osmolalidad sérica en pacientes hiponatrémicos por alguna otra razón
   * La hiponatremia con una osmolalidad sérica alta se puede observar con hiperglucemia, insuficiencia renal avanzada o, con menos frecuencia, en asociación con la administración de manitol o maltosa hipertónicos. En la insuficiencia renal avanzada, la elevación asociada del nitrógeno ureico en sangre puede contrarrestar la caída de la osmolaridad sérica inducida por la hiponatremia. Sin embargo, la osmolaridad sérica efectiva se reduce apropiadamente en este contexto ya que la urea es un osmol ineficaz.La hiponatremia con una osmolalidad sérica normal (o casi normal) puede resultar de la adición de un líquido isosmótico pero que no contiene sodio al espacio extracelular, como ocurre con el uso de soluciones de lavado de glicina o sorbitol no conductoras durante la resección transuretral de la próstata. o vejiga
   * La pseudohiponatremia se define como una concentración sérica de sodio artificialmente baja asociada con una osmolalidad sérica normal debido a elevaciones marcadas en lípidos o proteínas, lo que resulta en una reducción en la fracción sérica que contiene agua

REFERENCES